Simplifying Storage Chargeback/Showback with Tintri – Part 2 (Capacity)

In the first post of this three part series, we discussed the challenges around Storage Chargeback and Showback in traditional environments. This post will focus on the Capacity based Model for Chargeback/Showback and how Tintri brings in more accuracy and value add to the model.

As we all know (by now – refer my other blog posts), Tintri doesn’t use a LUN/Volume abstraction layer like traditional storage platforms. LUNs/Volumes were designed for physical environments and we just continued to use them for virtualized environments since there was no innovation done by storage vendors specifically for virtualized deployments (until now). Tintri uses vDisks (think VMDKs, VVOLS, VHDs etc.) as the abstraction layer in the storage platform. Using vDisks as the abstraction layer, allows it to see at the right level of abstraction without the added complexity or layers of LUNs/Volumes. What this means to a Service Provider (Internal IT or Public) is that now they can not just look at what is provisioned to a VM or used inside the VM but the overall Capacity Footprint of a VM. The overall Capacity Footprint of a VM not just consists of the Live Data but also space used for other things like Data Protection.

In the example below, I have highlighted the VM Demo-A. As you can see that in the Tintri GUI, you not only see the provisioned space but also the actual used space by the VM in the Used GiB column. Double clicking the VM shows us various graphs for the VM and in this case I have selected the ‘Space’ Graph that shows us exactly how a 50GiB VM is using 134.5GiBs. We breakdown the 134.5 GiBs into Live Data, Hypervisor Snapshots and Tintri Snapshots to give a complete picture of the Capacity Footprint of the VM.

Capacity Showback

Tintri GUI Screenshot showing the Capacity Footprint of a VM

This is not only important because it allows the IT/Service Provider to charge for the right amount of storage consumed by the tenant, therefore increasing the accuracy and predictability around Storage consumption but also because now the IT/Service Provider can provide more insight and value add.

Chargeback/Showback models can be complex. Here we take a very simplistic example –

  • If we consider the cost of 1 GB of storage as $3
    • With a traditional storage the chargeback would be 50GB x $3 = $150
    • Whereas the actual cost of the VM Demo-A is 134.5 GB x $3 = $403.5
      • So either the Service Provider is taking a hit here or is including this cost as a buffer in the overall costing per GB, making it less competitive
    • As a value add, IT/Service Provider can show the various buckets in which the capacity is being utilized in order for the Tenant to reduce its cost
      • So in case of the VM Demo-A the breakup would be –
        • Cost of Storing Live Data – 45GB x $3 = $135
        • Cost of Data Protection – $3 x (9.29GB+80GB) = $267.87
      • With this information in hand, the tenant can take a decision on deleting some of the older snapshot copies to reduce the cost of running the VM from a capacity standpoint

As we can see in this example, Tintri brings in more simplicity and accuracy with a Capacity based chargeback/showback model . In the next post, I will discuss the performance based model and how Tintri can help with implementing something that is potentially more accurate than a typical IOPs based model.

Thanks for reading.

Cheers..

@storarch

3 thoughts on “Simplifying Storage Chargeback/Showback with Tintri – Part 2 (Capacity)

  1. Pingback: Simplifying Storage Chargeback/Showback with Tintri- Part 1 | Virtual Data Blocks

  2. Pingback: Simplifying Storage Chargeback/Showback with Tintri – Part 3 (Performance) | Virtual Data Blocks

  3. Pingback: Improving Storage QoS Accuracy and Performance based Chargeback/Showback | Virtual Data Blocks

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s